Human Flesh by Nick Claussen – A Book Review

Human Flesh

Blurb:

During the winter of 2017, a series of strange occurrences took place in a small town of northern Maine. A rational explanation for what happened has still not been presented. Now, for the first time, all available evidence is being released to the public from what is commonly known as the Freyston case.

Human Flesh was originally published in Danish to great reviews, and is now available in English. This dark winter horror story will also satisfy crime lovers, as the plot is told through written evidence in a fictitious murder case. For fans of Hannibal Lecter, and those who enjoyed the mood of Pet Sematary and the style of Carrie.

 

Author: Nick Claussen

Page Count: 116

Genre: Horror

Release Date: Not listed on Amazon

Publisher: Presumed self-published

My Chosen Format: Kindle

My Rating of ‘Human Flesh’: 4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon UKAmazon US

 

Review:

Human Flesh is a great little punchy horror story that is quick, fun and easy to take in. At only 116 pages, it makes a nice change of pace from the bible-length epics told by Stephen King or some of the thick tomes of fantasy I have been reading. Sometimes you just need something short and fun, and ‘Human Flesh’ is certainly both.

Human Flesh is told exclusively through ‘found evidence’ such as phone trasncripts, letters, text messages and, the largest chunks of all, blog posts. It’s a medium of storytelling that is getting more and more common (I have read a couple short stories told in the form of newspaper articles or letters and have recently listened to a podcast told in the form of found evidence). It’s an interesting and enjoyable way of reading a story (nothing ever feels like its too long-winded, that’s for sure) but it isn’t a method that will go down well with everyone. It certainly feels very specialist as far as reading tastes go.

The story features a brother and sister who have gone to stay with their grandfather on his farm due to their skiing holiday getting cancelled. As soon as they arrive they pick up on the strange way their grandfather is acting and, along with a local named Martin, are concerned for the old man’s wellbeing.

Things get stranger and stranger as the book goes on and leads into a very ‘thank God this isn’t happening to me scenario’. The story being told is an enjoyable one and, due to the quick nature of the writing, it keeps you turning the pages. My only negative is that, due to the medium the story is being told in, I just don’t think there was ever any potential to be truly scared/unnerved by the story.

That is, however, the only negative I have to say about it. It’s still a very enjoyable, fast-paced read and I’m glad I picked it up. I’m not sure how long it will be free on the kindle store, so its well worth checking out.

 

17 thoughts on “Human Flesh by Nick Claussen – A Book Review

  1. You are so right: sometimes it’s just nice to read a bit of a short story instead of a 1000 page tome. That said, this one really does sound very interesting indeed. Thanks for sharing this😊😊

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m not a fan of horror, tbh 😉 My imagination runs amok even without additional prodding, true, but with horrors there is also the problem of usually very schematic plotting and overuse of old tricks (which is simply deathly boring ;))

        Liked by 1 person

    1. If ever you find yourself with time or the inclination to listen a podcast based on found evidence of a team that went missing in the depths of winter at a research station in Iceland, try The White Vault. Roughly twenty mins per episode. Probably the best found evidence podcast/story/thing I have come across.

      Look forward to seeing your thoughts if you get a chance to try Human Flesh 😊

      Liked by 1 person

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