Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett – A Book Review

Blurb: ‘They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.’ Everybody knows there’s no such thing as a female wizard. So when the wizard Drum Billet accidentally passes on his staff of power to an eighth daughter of an eighth son, a girl…… Continue reading Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett – A Book Review

Stupid Me and My Non-Note Taking Ways – Mini Reviews Happening Instead

Having been super-busy with work and writing etc … I haven’t been blogging as much. So, I decided that the best way to capitalise on all the reading and listening I was still doing was to take notes and write reviews of everything for when I came back a bit more regularly. Guess who took…… Continue reading Stupid Me and My Non-Note Taking Ways – Mini Reviews Happening Instead

The Watchers by A. M. Shine – A Book Review

Blurb: You can’t see them. But they can see you. This forest isn’t charted on any map. Every car breaks down at its treeline. Mina’s is no different. Left stranded, she is forced into the dark woodland only to find a woman shouting, urging Mina to run to a concrete bunker. As the door slams…… Continue reading The Watchers by A. M. Shine – A Book Review

The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett – An Audio Book Review

Blurb: Somewhere between thought and reality exists the Discworld, a magical world not totally unlike our own. Except for the fact that it travels through space on the shoulders of four giant elephants who in turn stand on the shell of an astronomically huge star turtle, of course. Rincewind is the world’s worst wizard who…… Continue reading The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett – An Audio Book Review

The Chestnut Man by Søren Sveistrup – A Book Review

Blurb: As the leaves fall, he’s coming for you . . . One October morning in a quiet suburb, the police make a terrible discovery. A young woman is found brutally murdered with one of her hands missing. Above her hangs a small doll made of chestnuts. Examining the doll, Forensics are shocked to find…… Continue reading The Chestnut Man by Søren Sveistrup – A Book Review

Cain’s Last Stand by Sandy Mitchell – An Audio Book Review

Blurb: After a long and distinguished career defending the Imperium from its many enemies, Commissar Cain is enjoying a well-deserved retirement on Perlia, teaching in a schola progenium. But when a Black Crusade threatens the sector, all able-bodied citizens must rise to the defence, including Cain and his cadets. As the forces of Chaos overwhelm…… Continue reading Cain’s Last Stand by Sandy Mitchell – An Audio Book Review

Blood of the Chosen by Django Wexler – A Book Review

Blurb: Deep below the Gap, Gyre Silvereye discovered a city, hidden far from human eyes. There, the ghouls have dwelt for four hundred years in hibernation, awaiting the moment to wreak their vengeance on the Dawn Republic. With their help, Gyre can finally see a way to overthrow the all-powerful Twilight Order. But the ghouls…… Continue reading Blood of the Chosen by Django Wexler – A Book Review

Notes From The Burning Age by Claire North – A Book Review

Blurb Ven was once a holy man, a keeper of ancient archives. It was his duty to interpret archaic texts, sorting useful knowledge from the heretical ideas of the Burning Age – a time of excess and climate disaster. For in Ven’s world, such material must be closely guarded, so that the ills that led…… Continue reading Notes From The Burning Age by Claire North – A Book Review

The Final Girl Support Group by Grady Hendrix – A Book Review

Blurb: In horror movies, the final girl is the one who’s left standing when the credits roll. The one who fought back, defeated the killer, and avenged her friends. The one who emerges bloodied but victorious. But after the sirens fade and the audience moves on, what happens to her? Lynnette Tarkington survived a massacre…… Continue reading The Final Girl Support Group by Grady Hendrix – A Book Review

Murder: The Biography by Kate Morgan – A Book Review

Blurb: The stories and the people involved in the history of murder are stranger, darker and more compulsive than any crime fiction. There’s Richard Parker, the cannibalized cabin boy whose death at the hands of his hungry crewmates led the Victorian courts to decisively outlaw a defence of necessity to murder. Dr Percy Bateman, the…… Continue reading Murder: The Biography by Kate Morgan – A Book Review